Who We Are

Our Mission


To enhance and promote the equality, self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion of people with disabilities through education, strategic advocacy, and legal intervention.

Disability Rights Maine (DRM) is Maine’s Protection & Advocacy agency for people with disabilities. This means we represent people whose rights have been violated or who have been discriminated against based on their disability. We also provide training on rights and self-advocacy and we advocate for public policy reform. DRM believes that people with disabilities must:

  • Be treated with respect and be free from abuse;
  • Control the decisions that affect their lives;
  • Receive the services and supports necessary to live independently;
  • Have the opportunity to work and contribute to society;
  • Have equal access to the same opportunities afforded all other members of society; and
  • Fully participate in all aspects of society: education, work, and community.


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DRM Board of Directors

  • Chad Hansen, Esq., President
  • James Clifford, Esq., Vice President
  • Sean Ociepka, Esq., Secretary
  • Corin Swift, Esq., Treasurer
  • Richard O'Meara, Esq., Immediate Past President
  • Simonne Maline
  • Eric McVay
  • Amy Phalon, Esq.
  • Kathleen Shevenell
  • Willie Tarr
  • Rachel Violette, Esq.
  • Sally Walsh
  • Neal Williams

Board of Directors Advisory Committee

  • Gil Broberg
  • Mary Herman
  • Pat O’Brien, MBA, CAS
  • Howard Reben, Esq.
  • David Webbert, Esq.
  • Jeffrey Neil Young, Esq.

DRM Staff

PAIMI Advisory Council

The PAIMI Advisory Council (PAC) advises Disability Rights Maine on priorities and issues important to people who receive mental health services in Maine, and promotes recovery through increased access to client rights and advocacy services.

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  • Simonne Maline, Chair
  • Cathy Bustin
  • Melissa Caswell
  • Karen Evans
  • Hank Hainke, Esq.
  • Emily Johnson
  • Elizabeth Kramer
  • Vickie McCarty
  • Lydia Richard
  • Russell Thayer
  • Laurie Wallace

History of the P&A System

"The Protection and Advocacy (P&A) concept was triggered by a series of local television news broadcasts, which Geraldo Rivera did for the ABC News affiliate in New York City. Rivera's investigative reporting exposed abuse, neglect and lack of programming at Willowbrook, a state institution for people with developmental disabilities on Staten Island.

There are eight separate P&A programs all described briefly below, in order chronologically based on when they were created.

  • PADD (Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities). PADD is the first P&A program, created by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights (DD) Act of 1975. P&A agencies are required by the Act to pursue legal, administrative and other appropriate remedies to protect and advocates for the rights of individuals with developmental disabilities under all applicable federal and state laws. The DD Act provided for the governor of each state to designate an agency to be the P&A and to assure that the P&A was, and would remain, independent of any service provider. Most entities designated as P&As are private non-profit organizations created specifically for the purpose of conducting the P&A programs. However, some P&As are part of state government, a few are hybrid quasi-public agencies, and a few P&As reside within civil legal services programs. Subsequent P&A statutes, with a single exception (CAP), provide for the new P&A programs to be housed within the same agency designated by the governors under PADD.
  • CAP (Client Assistance Program). CAP was established by the 1984 Amendments to the Rehabilitation (Rehab) Act. Services provided by CAPs include assistance in pursuing administrative, legal and other appropriate remedies to persons receiving or seeking services from state rehabilitation agencies under the Rehab Act. A CAP agency may provide assistance and advocacy with respect to services that are directly related to employment for the client or client applicant. CAP is the only program that does not require the funds to go to the entity designated as the P&A under PADD. In Maine, CARES, Inc. operates the Client Assistance Program.
  • PAIMI (Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness). The PAIMI Program was established in 1986. The P&As are mandated to protect and advocate for the rights of people with mental illness and investigate reports of abuse and neglect in facilities that care for or treat individuals with mental illness. The Act was subsequently amended to allow P&As also to serve individuals with mental illness who reside in the community.
  • PAIR (Protection and Advocacy for Individual Rights). The PAIR program was established by Congress under an amendment to the Rehabilitation Act in 1993. PAIR programs provide for services to persons with disabilities who are not eligible for services under the three previously established P&A programs (PADD, PAIMI, and CAP). With PAIR, the P&As were thus authorized to serve persons with all types of disabilities. Although PAIR is funded at a lower level than PADD and PAIMI, it represents an important component of a comprehensive system to advocate for the rights of all persons with disabilities.
  • PAAT (Protection & Advocacy for Assistive Technology). The PAAT program was created in 1994 when Congress expanded the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act) to include funding for P&As to assist individuals with disabilities in the acquisition, utilization, or maintenance of assistive technology devices or assistive technology services through case management, legal representation and self advocacy training.
  • PABSS (Protection & Advocacy for Beneficiaries of Social Security). The PABSS program was established in 1999 when the Ticket to Work and Work Incentive Improvement Act (TWWIIA) was enacted into law. Under this Act, grants to the P&A programs provide advocacy and other services to assist beneficiaries of Social Security secure or regain gainful employment.
  • PATBI (Protection & Advocacy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury). The PATBI program was created in 2002 to provide protection and advocacy services to individuals with traumatic brain injury. Although P&As often served such individuals under PAIR, CAP, or PABSS, this grant provides more resources specifically to address the unique needs of this population.
  • PAVA (Protection & Advocacy for Voting Accessibility). The PAVA program was established in 2003 as part of the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA). Under this program, P&As have a mandate to help ensure that individuals with disabilities participate in the electoral process through voter education, training of poll officials, registration drives, and polling place accessibility surveys. P&A agencies may not use PAVA program funds for litigation. There is no such restriction in any of the other P&A programs."

(Credit: National Disability Rights Network)

Intern/Extern Program

DRM provides intern/extern opportunities for qualified law school students with an interest in public interest law. If you would like more information about a DRM intern/externship, please contact us advocate@drme.org.

Volunteer Opportunities

DRM is looking for qualified members for our Board of Directors and our Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness Advisory Council (PAIMI Council). If you are interested in volunteering in any of these capacities, please contact Kim Moody at DRM.